Taylor Swift demanded equality and an end to ‘toxic male privilege’ in the music world.

During the Music Awards event, the world-famous pop star accepted the Billboard’s inaugural Woman of the Decade honour.

Swift recalled what she described as the past “magnificent, happy, free, confused, sometimes lonely but mostly golden” 10 years in a soul-baring speech that touched on the past, present and future for female artists in the industry.

The 10-time Grammy winner spoke in length about losing the rights to her master recordings to Scooter Braunin a deal that she said was agreed to without her “approval, consultation or consent.”

Her speech began in part; “So what does it mean to be the woman of this decade? Well, it means I’ve seen a lot. When this decade began I was 20-years-old. I had put out my self-titled debut album when I was 16—the album that would become my breakthrough album, which was called fearless. I saw that there was a world of music beyond country music that I was really curious about. I saw pop stations play my songs “Love Story” and “You Belong With Me” for the first time, and I saw that as a female in this industry some people will always have slight reservations about you. Whether you deserve to be there, whether your male producer or co-writer is the reason for your success, or whether it was a savvy record label.”

It wasn’t,” Taylor remarked with a smirk. “I saw that people loved to explain away a woman’s success in the music industry and I saw something in me change due to this realization. This was the decade when I became a mirror for my detractors. Whatever they decided I couldn’t do is exactly what I did. Whatever they criticized about me became material for musical satire or inspirational anthems. The best lyrical examples I can think of are songs like ‘Mean,’ ‘Shake It Off’ and ‘Blank Space.’ Basically, if people had something to say about me I said something back in my own way. This reflux dictated more than just my lyrics.”

As a result, Swift said she entered an endless cycle of “accommodating” and “over correcting” to appease her critics. “They’re saying I’m dating too much in my twenties? OK, I’ll stop. I’ll just be single for years. Now they’re saying my album Red is filled with too many breakup songs. OK, I’ll make one about moving to New York and deciding my life is just more fun with my friends. Oh, they’re saying my music is changing too much for me to stay in country music? Here’s an entire genre shift and a pop album called 1989. You heard it? Sick!” she described.

Her speech began in part, “So what does it mean to be the woman of this decade? Well, it means I’ve seen a lot. When this decade began I was 20-years-old. I had put out my self-titled debut album when I was 16—the album that would become my breakthrough album, which was calledFearless. I saw that there was a world of music beyond country music that I was really curious about. I saw pop stations play my songs “Love Story” and “You Belong With Me” for the first time, and I saw that as a female in this industry some people will always have slight reservations about you. Whether you deserve to be there, whether your male producer or co-writer is the reason for your success, or whether it was a savvy record label.”

“It wasn’t,” Taylor remarked with a smirk. “I saw that people loved to explain away a woman’s success in the music industry and I saw something in me change due to this realization. This was the decade when I became a mirror for my detractors. Whatever they decided I couldn’t do is exactly what I did. Whatever they criticized about me became material for musical satire or inspirational anthems. The best lyrical examples I can think of are songs like ‘Mean,’ ‘Shake It Off’ and ‘Blank Space.’ Basically if people had something to say about me I said something back in my own way. This reflux dictated more than just my lyrics.”

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As a result, Swift said she entered an endless cycle of “accommodating” and “over correcting” to appease her critics. “They’re saying I’m dating too much in my twenties? OK, I’ll stop. I’ll just be single for years. Now they’re saying my album Red is filled with too many breakup songs. OK, I’ll make one about moving to New York and deciding my life is just more fun with my friends. Oh, they’re saying my music is changing too much for me to stay in country music? Here’s an entire genre shift and a pop album called 1989. You heard it? Sick!” she described.